Create a Culture of Planning: 10 Characteristics of Proactive Equipment Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.”

If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is.

Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today.

In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

A Culture of Planning is defined by the way an organization, or in this specific case the asset management team of an organization, views and executes the task of planning. Yet, there are many types of planning. In some cases organizations may embrace strategic planning but eschew a commitment to continuity planning. In the property manager’s case, planning refers to emergency / continuity planning, or a formal contingency plan – tested, proven and documented – for the protection and accountability of valuable assets.

A Culture of Planning ensures that when disaster strikes, management will know exactly what to do to safeguard employees and assets, secure the building, protect data, and reroute communications. Essentially, a Culture of Planning ensures that, no matter the scenario, an organization will have the collective competency to persevere.

An organization with a well-developed Culture of Planning:

1. Emphasizes flexibility and leverages creativity to foster recovery efforts.  This could be better thought of as resilience. Resilience must be a pre-existing quality rather than a reactionary effort. Resilience implies that the management, asset managers, and all other decision makers have accounted for a degree of failure and have taken the steps to account for it. Consequently, resilience, flexibility, and creativity are woven into the fabric of the organization.

2. Understand the appropriate responses. Organization that promote a Culture of Planning will neither under-plan, which renders employees and assets critically vulnerable, nor will they over-plan by developing strategies that are entirely too complex and offer little, if any, practical value. Management’s confidence in their asset management team’s ability to mitigate a crisis scenario allows that team to focus on just the potential problem and its solutions.

3. Look into the future and embrace the inevitable potential for disaster. There is no room for naivety in business yet some organizations, like some people, think that if they ignore a potential issue or incident, it will either go away or never manifest. A mature organization — an organization with a Culture of Planning — seeks out and engages the hazards before they occur, thus allowing the organization to better react when a crisis situation arises.

4. Leverages experience. Mature organizations will learn from both their mistakes and their successes, and place value in each. Experienced decision-makers improve the organization’s culture by skills by:

  • engaging in deliberate practice
  • compiling an extensive experience bank
  • obtaining accurate, timely and diagnostic asset data
  • reviewing experiences to derive new insights and learning.

5. Does not rely on experience alone. Effective organizations never confuse the distinction between “frequency” and “probability.” Organizations need to understand that no two emergency scenarios are alike. So while the experiences learned from dealing with one situation are invaluable, they cannot be used as the be-all, end-all of disaster protocol. Organizations that rely only on past experiences (or lack thereof) leave themselves vulnerable to future disasters.

6. Roll with the punches. The threat to an organization’s assets is constant; catastrophes, both big and small, will hit every organization despite maintaining a well-developed asset management plan. However, organizations that are prepared to react to these situations will absorb the loss productively. In this sense they will roll with the punches and grow from the experience. Ignorance arises when organizations could and should have foreseen the disaster, yet remained unprepared for one reason or another. Unfortunately the culture that gives rise to opportunity for ignorance seldom recognizes itself as such. They are, therefore, prone to repeat their mistake.

7. Has a high tolerance of ambiguity. Ambiguity lends itself to uncertainty; uncertainty implies a lack of control, and incremental lack of control is one pervasive characteristic of an emergency or disaster. Acceptance of this lack of control comes from understanding that the organization has a plan designed to return control to decision makers during an emergency scenario. This calmness of an organization during a crisis situation is dependent on their ability to think about problems from all angles, not just the nuts and bolts of solving them. Once the process is mastered, problem solving becomes the application of a variable-yet-iterative process.

8. Embraces, emphasizes and values testing, training and exercising. Arranging training sessions is possibly the least enjoyable but most necessary assignment an asset manager can undertake. Resistance from executives and staff members alike makes training and exercise sessions a real problem. However, property managers working in a company with a developed Culture of Planning will be given the benefit of the doubt; after all this culture inherently values the dress rehearsal for the “big one.”

9. Constantly scans the environment and has a conversational/technical knowledge of threats. A conversational technical/knowledge of threats means that the emergency manager not only knows what is “out there” to put the organization at risk, but also knows enough about the threat to understand why the threat is real.

10. Resists the “urgent” in deference to the “important.” A key vulnerability exhibited by far too many organizations is that more time and attention is spent on important matters, and less time is spent attending to urgent matters. Though the work indisputably expands to fill the time available for its completion, the nature of the work in which we engage is entirely under our control.

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Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

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Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

What are the guiding principles to our product development?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Three Things to Do when Migrating eQuip! To a New Data Center

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

3 Things You Need to Do before Installing IT Asset Management Software

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Why should you investigate RFID tags for better asset management?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Is Your Government Property Management System Meeting All the Requirements?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

If you would like, help to complete the 2013 Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) survey

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

How to prepare for better IT asset management by introducing the RFID technology?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Building the Necessary Foundation for an Effective Property Management Plan — Part Four

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Visual Asset Manager and eQuip! 6.4.0. Some new features and major improvements.

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Building the Necessary Foundation for an Effective Property Management Plan — Part Three

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Building the Necessary Foundation for an Effective Property Management Plan – Part Two

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Building the Necessary Foundation for an Effective Property Management Plan — Part One

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

EAM, CMMS — what are the differences?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Defining a Return on Investment in Your Enterprise Asset Management Project Part 2

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Defining a Return on Investment in Your Enterprise Asset Management Project Part 1

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Implementing Better Asset Management Strategies in Local Government – An Interview with Scott Pepperman Part 2

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

The State of Asset Management in Local Government – An Interview with Scott Pepperman Part 1

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

How do you manage the inventory of IT hardware accurately?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

What should you be looking for in an IT Asset Management software solution?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

3 things you should be looking for in an Enterprise Asset Management solution in 2013

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

E-ISG Christmas Carol: E-A-Ms (to the melody of Jingle Bells)

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

What are the property management challenges facing universities and research institutions?

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Key Back-End Technology Features of Enterprise Asset Management software solutions – An Interview with Robert Kaehler Part 2

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Key Front-End Technology Features of an Enterprise Asset Management system – An Interview with Robert Kaehler part 1

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Challenges to Emergency Management Caused by Lack of Efficient Equipment Management Practices in Local Government Organizations – An Interview with Tom Heseltine Part 2

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

A Business Approach for Implementing Life Cycle Management, with Al Hardy Part 4

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Equipment Management Bandit on the Loose: Never Audit

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Continuing Education in Emergency Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Enterprise Asset Management in the News: An Interview with Jackie Luo

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Understanding the Ecosystem of Resource Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

The 5 Common Failures of Equipment Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Improve Equipment Management – Not all Data is of Equal Value

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Back-to-School: A Quick Lesson in Property Management Standards

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Escape Excel Hell

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

UASI Conference Themes: Questions for Bill Anderson

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Reconciling Equipment Data to Create Total Asset Visibility

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Internal Communication and Interagency Cooperation

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Equipment Tracking From the Pentagon to the Local Level

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Broadband Communications Network for Disaster Preparedness

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Don’t Make These Critical Biases in Emergency and Equipment Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

3 Key Competencies of Emergency and Asset Management Programs

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

How 9/11 Changed Emergency and Property Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Resource Sharing and Interoperability Through Equipment Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Total Asset Visibility: 3 Factors to Proactive Disaster Recovery

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Equipment Management and Disaster Preparedness Tips for Small Businesses

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Achieve Total Asset Visibility, Business Continuity Through Practice

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Total Asset Visibility and Business Continuity

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Equipment Management and the Public/Private Partnership

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

3 Manager Attitudes that Lead to Disaster

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Effective Property Management and Crisis Preparedness

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

9 Steps towards a Fixed and Mobile Asset Inventory Audit

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

8 Steps Towards Creating an Equipment Management Plan

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Managing Risk with Total Asset Visibility

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Cost Saving Opportunities Every Property Manager Should Use

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Maintain Total Asset Visibility in the Age of Reduced Budgets

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Never Use Spreadsheets to Determine Asset Depreciation

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Forecasting for Equipment Management

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

A Sound Equipment Management Solution is the Key to Business Success

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Choosing an Equipment Management System – Part 3

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Choosing an Equipment Management System – Part 2

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Choosing an Equipment Management System – Part 1

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Equipment Accountability for Emergency Management Agencies

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

5 Common Equipment Inventory Mistakes

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

Fixed Asset Software Eliminates Costly Mistakes in Asset Tracking

Dale Carnegie, author of the best-selling self-help book “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” once said, “First ask yourself:  What is the worst that can happen? Then prepare to accept it. Then proceed to improve on the worst.” If this isn’t the mantra of a property manager I don’t know what is. Much of a property manager’s day-to-day responsibilities involve preparing and predicting for the unknown. Whether analyzing hypothetical “what if” scenarios to identify potential gaps in preparedness, running exhaustive internal audits to ensure the accuracy of asset data or coordinating the efforts of disparate organizational departments through training, a property manager is always looking towards the future in an effort to prepare for today. In essence, effective property managers create a Culture of Planning.

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